Reasoning & explaining (MP2, MP3)

Effective Problem-Solving Instruction

This summary describes a wide range of research-based recommendations for guiding instruction in problem solving. Three important strategies that apply at all grade levels and in all areas of math are: use of visual representations, encouragement of multiple approaches to solving problems, and linking mathematical and algebraic notation to intuitive approaches.

 

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Problems

In the media piece, Connecting Mathematical Ideas to Notation, Sybilla Beckmann presents two examples of problems showing how students can connect mathematical concepts and notation. This sample material has the problem statements along with the solution ideas given by Beckmann.

 

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Pre-Conference Planning Form

Elementary math coaches in the Papillion-La Vista School District use a lesson pre-conference planning form with teachers. Coaches work with teachers to consider goals and students’ experience and interests as they prepare problems and incorporate problem-solving activities into lessons.

 

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Coach Talk

Listen in as two mathematics coaches discuss being strategic in the selection of problems and planning for classroom discussions including use of the Pre-Conference Planning Form.

 

FEATURING: Jane McGill & Danielle Inserra, Papillion Junior High School (NE)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Coach Talk

 

Listen to two mathematics coaches from the Papillion-La Vista School District share the concepts they emphasize when working with teachers, including the importance of comparing multiple approaches to solving a problem and debriefing the strategies students have used.

 

FEATURING: Jane McGill & Danielle Inserra, Papillion Junior High School (NE)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

The Concepts Behind Operations

David C. Geary describes how to build students’ understanding of the concepts underlying operations with fractions, common misconceptions that children have, and what can be learned from their errors.

 

FEATURING: David C. Geary, University of Missouri

SOURCE: Doing What Works

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