Informational Text

Text Structure Activities and Student Work

This sample material includes a lesson plan, signal words, literacy cards, and graphic organizers used to help students learn about text structures. Two examples of student work are included to show how students use a Venn diagram during a classroom reading activity. View the presentation, Interactive Strategies for Teaching Nonfiction Text Structure, to see how these materials are used in the classroom.

 

FEATURING: Dawn Chappelear, Third- and Fourth-Grade Teacher, Garfield Elementary School (KS)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Interactive Strategies for Teaching Nonfiction Text Structure

A third/fourth-grade teacher shares instructional activities designed to help her students understand the compare-contrast and sequence nonfiction text structures. She uses cooperative learning strategies, graphic organizers, and games. View the related sample material, Text Structure Activities and Student Work.

 

FEATURING: Dawn Chappelear, Third- and Fourth-Grade Teacher, Garfield Elementary School (KS)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Bat-Bird Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer

This organizer was used by a third-grade teacher to teach the compare and contrast nonfiction text structure. It includes filled-in student examples, sections for recording similarities and differences, and clue word comparisons. Watch the presentation Compare-Contrast Graphic Organizer: A Whale Is Not a Fish to see how this tool is used.

 

FEATURING: Lake Forest North Elementary School (DE)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Compare-Contrast Graphic Organizer

Watch a third-grade teacher use a graphic organizer to help students compare and contrast information in a nonfiction text. She models the use of clue words and provides practice through partner sharing and independent work. See the related sample material, Bat-Bird Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer.

 

FEATURING: Nakia McNair, Third-Grade Teacher, Lake Forest North Elementary School (DE)

SOURCE: Doing What Works

Grade 9 Academic Literacy

Students in Cindy Ryan’s academic literacy class practice Thinking Aloud in a whole class metacognitive conversation. These students have shed self-consciousness about being confused, and may instead ask each other, “How did you figure that out?”

FEATURING:  Cindy Ryan, English Teacher

SOURCE: Reading Apprenticeship at WestEd

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